The Game is... Something.

“Because no matter how hard I’ve tried to resist it over these past eight months, you’ve become something I can’t see myself walking away from. Which is why I couldn’t walk through that door, towards you. I couldn’t.”

Excerpt From: Pawtal. “A Finger Slip.”
The Feels...
Sherlocking these...

thepotterwholockian:

I keep seeing posts listing all the reasons why Johnlock will never become canon and thought I’d respond as a longtime TJLCer who disagrees with that argument 100% of the time.

This is a response to this post, if you want to read the full thing.

I very much doubt that Johnlock will ever…

May the light of Telperion shine upon me.

sodelightfully:

Cumbercupcakes: All BC Ice Bucket Challenge lol!!

Don’t forget to donate http://www.alsa.org/fight-als/ice-bucket-challenge.html

(via threepatchpodcast)

dadaistango:

Borges, Jorge Luis
imageAn ardent admirer of Joyce, this blind Argentine mentions him several times in his writings, and was one of the first Spanish-language reviewers of Ulysses. He’s also written two poems about James Joyce: “James Joyce,” and “Invocation to Joyce.” Here are some of the more interesting references to Joyce from some of his essays and lectures.


I believed, and still believe, that some twenty-five hundred years ago there was a prince of Nepal named Siddhartha or Gautama who became the Buddha, the Enlightened or Awakened One – as opposed to the rest of us who are sleeping or are dreaming this great dream that is life. I remember that line of Joyce: “History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.” Well, Siddhartha, at age thirty, woke up and became the Buddha. – 1977 Lecture: “Buddhism” - Jorge Luis Borges

 We have these two vast and – why not say it? – unreadable novels, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. But that is only half of his work (which also includes beautiful poems and the admirable Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). The other half, and perhaps the most redeeming aspect (as they now say) is the fact that he took on the almost infinite English language. That language – which is statistically larger than all the others and offers so many possibilities for the writer, particularly in its concrete verbs – was not enough for him. Joyce, an Irishman, recalled that Dublin had been founded by Danish Vikings. He studied Norwegian – he wrote a letter to Ibsen in Norwegian – and then he studied Greek, Latin … He knew all the languages, and he wrote in a language invented by himself, difficult to understand but marked by a strange music. Joyce brought a new music to English. And he said, valorously (and mendaciously) that “of all the things that have happened to me, I think that the least important was having been blind.” Part of his vast work was executed in darkness: polishing the sentences in his memory, working at times for a whole day on a single phrase, and then writing it and correcting it. All in the midst of blindness or periods of blindness.
– 1977 Lecture: “Blindness”



Source The Modern Word

Georgie <3

(via joyceansreadjoyce)

takenbyabook:

beben-eleben:

Six-Word Stories That Are Absolutely Heart-Breaking

OH MY GOD.

Oh, no…

(via foriamsincerity)

blottedpen:

Richard III

As my friend bookofthel said earlier: “…a Plantagenet always pays his debts.”

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